Spinal cord changes in longstanding CRPS

This is brilliant:

Spinal cord histopathological alterations in a patient with longstanding complex regional pain syndrome

The authors did an autopsy on one person with longstanding CRPS and did comparative autopsies on 4 people who did not have CRPS. They checked samples from the neck, thorax, and low-back for microglia and astrocytes. These are the kinds of cells that not only are part of the nervous system’s immune response, but also increase the transmission of pain signals. That means, inflammation plus more pain! They found plenty in the CRPS patient’s spine.

They also found that the normal cells in the dorsal horn of the spine – the ones that carry sensations of light touch, vibration, and proprioception (the sense of the body in space) – are significantly fewer in the CRPS patient. This makes sense of the fact that allodynia (light touch) gets worse, vibration is so agonizing (making both riding public transit and holding a steering wheel pretty horrible), and we get clumsy over time because we can’t quite feel where our bodies are in space.

These strange cellular changes were found “most prominently at the level of the original injury, but extending throughout the entire length of the spinal cord.” That means that the allodynia, diminished balance, etc. physically spread from the original dorsal root, all the way up and down the spine, affecting the whole physical self.

So, with more cells for pain and immune attack, and fewer cells to transport normal messages of light touch, vibration, and proprioception, we have some stunningly clear evidence that the spreading allodynia, clumsiness, and intolerance to vibration is NOT IMAGINARY.

Given how many people get told that it’s all in their heads, they’re hurting because they’re thinking wrong or because they were abused as children, etc., this is an important thing to keep in mind. Let’s keep the cart behind the horse.

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