More sleep, less pain

This study uses healthy volunteers, but the anecdotal evidence and related science in those of us with pain conditions does suggest a profound correlation between sleep and pain:

Extended Sleep Reduces Pain Sensitivity

Interesting that they specifically note that less than 2 hours’ extra sleep is more effective than a substantial dose of codeine!


Why premature birth shouldn’t be iatrogenic

I’m delighted to get my hands on an article about a study done by a nurse. Prof. Sullivan, RN and her team say, “Effects of premature birth can reach into adulthood.”

Do you know why this is, logically, a candidate for the Department of the Blitheringly Obvious?

It has to do with fetal development. In a healthy pregnancy (that is, most of them), labor starts when the fetus’s lungs — the last thing to finish developing — are done. Then the fetus signals the mother’s body, and labor begins.

The neurological system and heart are getting the finishing touches in those last few weeks, too. The final stages of fetal development are extremely important, and ever more so as it gets harder and costlier to get care in this country.

Why does getting care matter? Aren’t preemies a lot easier to deliver?

They pop out faster, yes. They also tend to need time in the neonatal ICU.

But wait, there’s more.

This article goes on to say that premature babies tend to have lifelong problems with — you guessed it — heart, lungs, and neurology. Neurological issues that consistently show up relate to coordination; learning (especially math); memory; and, most worryingly, hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis problems — which messes up the body’s ability to regulate weight, growth, anxiety, sleep, and mood; it’s a major factor in CRPS, MS, and other constitutional illnesses.

These people are far more likely to require extra care and attention from parents, school, doctors, nurses, and therapists of both body and mind, _throughout_their_lives_ — or at least, as Prof. Sullivan has shown, to the age of 21. More data to follow, as the study continues.

This is why I find “elective c-sections”, which are often done at 37 weeks just to avoid the final stage of pregnancy, so appalling. They combine the drawbacks and long-term effects of prematurity with those of nonvaginal delivery and abdominal surgery. A full house, you might say.

Back to this article, which focuses on people who were born 21 years ago, when prematurity was not optional.

She states that these personalities tend to be more driven and success-oriented. On the one hand, that could be the cortisol talking (remember the lack of regulation? These people have higher than normal cortisol levels.) On the other, these are all people who have had a higher than average level of care, attention and structure in their young lives, and that tends to produce these characteristics anyway. When young people internalize the message that there are a lot of capable adults who really care what happens to them, they don’t see failure as anything but learning how not to do it next time. And that’s a setup for success.

Having explicated her stated finding, I have to say that she did not, nor did I read anything here about how she measured these personality characteristics. In short, it’s possible she was looking for ways to make everyone feel better about the learning disabilities and systemic issues.

And that, frankly, is one of the common characteristics of nurse studies that tend to lessen the respect they otherwise deserve: nurses who achieve worldly success don’t get there without being good at making decision-makers feel good.

I looked for the text of the study at her site, but no luck. I’ll look on PubMed once I’m off this handheld. I’d like to clear up that last gratuitous silliness, if I can.

* Can’t find it on PubMed. It was published very recently, so it might be worth checking back.


Rising star of brain found to regulate circadian rhythms

Glial cells are part of the nervous system, kind of woven throughout it, appearing more densely in some areas (the brain) than others (the fingertips.) They were formerly considered to be just support structures, but I remember, back around 1990, reading articles linking them to inflammatory processes in the brain. Therefore I figured they were part of the brain’s immune system, but science (and funding) didn’t make that short leap (inflammation to immune response) until recently. Now they’re considered key to the brain’s own immune system.

Astrocytes (‘astro’ means star; ‘cyte’ means cell) are a type of glial cell, named for their spiky, roundish, star-like shape. This article says that, in fruit flies at least, astrocytes regulate the sleep/wake cycle:

This is interesting because the circadian rhythm is disrupted in CRPS, and we’ve recently learned that astrocytes and other glial cells are disrupted by CRPS too. Assuming human’s astrocytes are functionally similar to fruit flies’ astrocytes, that circadian rhythm issue might be caused — or at least mediated — by those twinkling astrocytes.